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Ducky

Upgrading my computer 2: the sequel

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I was thinking about the CPU in my computer and I think I do want to replace it. But I was wondering what other types of the i7 I could use. I mean Pikachu mentioned the i7 4790 but I'm wondering if there are slightly cheaper options that will do just as well.

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I was thinking about the CPU in my computer and I think I do want to replace it. But I was wondering what other types of the i7 I could use. I mean Pikachu mentioned the i7 4790 but I'm wondering if there are slightly cheaper options that will do just as well.

 

Keeping your motherboard, any LGA1150-socket CPU with a power consumption at or under 84W should be fine.  That narrows it down to a subset of the 4xxx series of Core models, as well as an assortment of non-Core CPUs (such as the Pentium G32xx).  K-branded models (e.g., the i5 4670K) have higher clocks compared to their non-K counterparts and can be overclocked, though overclocking likely isn't supported on your current motherboard.

 

Judging by your current clock and model I think you have an i5 4570, which is a pretty high bar when it comes to 1150s.  The other i7 the Envy has guaranteed support for is the i7 4770 (K and non-K variants).

 

Anything lower (back in i5 territory) and you'd be spending a good amount for very little gain, in my opinion (provided you're not selling your existing CPU).  You could also go for the AM4 or LGA1151-socketed motherboards and a new CPU, though you'd also have to pick up DDR4 RAM.  If you do go for a new CPU / board / RAM, you should be set for a while (and have the option of some later upgrades down the line).

 

Do note that with LGA1151, Kaby Lake (Core 7xxx series) does not officially support versions of Windows older than Windows 10.  AM4 as a whole also does not officially support Windows versions older than 10.

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Currently in the middle of upgrading my comp. As it turns out my power supply is already 600w, so that's cool.

 

New graphics card I might be getting is a Zotac Gtx 1060. Any opinions on it?

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Currently in the middle of upgrading my comp. As it turns out my power supply is already 600w, so that's cool.

 

New graphics card I might be getting is a Zotac Gtx 1060. Any opinions on it?

Zotac just works just standard stuff they usually manufacture.  I've had their GTX 560 and it ran fine.  

 

Personal favourite NVIDIA GPU manufacturer is EVGA though.  EVGA has a program where if you buy a card and you aren't satisfied with it and say you want the 1070 instead you can pay the difference as long as you send it back to them.  Their customer service are much better. 

 

But overall though, the brand doesn't really make too much differences.  The only thing you should consider is the pricing and the specs like do I want a 3GB vs 6GB DDR5 version etc?  Higher memory lets you take advantage of higher resolution textures more easily and more games are taking advantage of the VRAM usage a lot more these days.  This will easily help in the long term for say 4K resolution games and maybe make like 5 fps difference in some games.

 

For example, here in my Call of Duty 4 Remastered, it literally eats up this much amount of my video ram on my GPU at very high settings.

 

 

YRemfsa.png

 

 

 

Here's GTAV on my end

 

 

BJoAmZC.png

 

 

 

You can check out the pricing at NCIX.

 

EVGA 3GB DDR5 version

http://www.ncix.com/detail/evga-geforce-gtx-1060-sc-b9-134742.htm

 

EVGA 6GB DDR5 version  (The one I have and it runs Overwatch in epic settings at 1080p)

http://www.ncix.com/detail/evga-geforce-gtx-1060-sc-b9-133580.htm

 

Zotac 6GB DDR5 version

http://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/product/zotac-zotac-geforce-gtx1060-6gb-ddr5-video-card-zt-p10600e-10h/10513471.aspx?

 

Zotac 6GB DDR5 mini version

http://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/product/zotac-zotac-geforce-gtx-1060-mini-6gb-gddr5-video-card-zt-p10600a-10l/10460254.aspx?

 

NCIX has the zotac version shown but they are in back-order so you might have to wait few days or weeks.

 

Just to let you know the NCIX i go to is literally beside Coquitlam Centre Mall.

http://www.ncix.com/contact/

Edited by kingddd

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Sorry, forgot to edit I changed cards because I got a deal on another one. Getting an Asus Gtx Turbo 1070 now instead, 8gig I believe. No idea what the difference is though.

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Sorry, forgot to edit I changed cards because I got a deal on another one. Getting an Asus Gtx Turbo 1070 now instead, 8gig I believe. No idea what the difference is though.

1070 Geforce is significantly faster than a 1060 Geforce.  Definitely better for a long term run.

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Okay, I got the CPU that Pikachu recommended (the Intel i7 4790) but when I went to look at the BIOS update site it only lists up to Windows 8.1 (I have Windows 10). Is it okay to use the latest BIOS update even if I have Windows 10 or will there be a problem?

 

Also what is the sequence that I should follow when replacing the CPU? Will I need to add new thermal paste, boot the computer normally or in a different mode, etc?

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Haven't been signed in on the forums lately, whoops.  Shoot me a Steam message if you need any more details.

 

Latest BIOS update should be fine; it's more hardware-layer support than anything.  Windows is generally mangled to hell in keeping backwards compatibility.

 

When replacing the CPU:

  1. Open computer.
  2. Remove existing CPU.  Clean off existing thermal paste.
  3. Install new CPU.  Apply new thermal paste.
  4. Start up the computer.  You may want to go into the BIOS settings and make sure you didn't previously set up a limit on processor cores or something similar.  Your CPU will still work, though you might have a less than optimal experience.
  5. Windows should detect the new hardware and you should be good to go.

Did a CPU-only upgrade myself and that was my experience.

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Haven't been signed in on the forums lately, whoops.  Shoot me a Steam message if you need any more details.

 

Latest BIOS update should be fine; it's more hardware-layer support than anything.  Windows is generally mangled to hell in keeping backwards compatibility.

 

When replacing the CPU:

  1. Open computer.
  2. Remove existing CPU.  Clean off existing thermal paste.
  3. Install new CPU.  Apply new thermal paste.
  4. Start up the computer.  You may want to go into the BIOS settings and make sure you didn't previously set up a limit on processor cores or something similar.  Your CPU will still work, though you might have a less than optimal experience.
  5. Windows should detect the new hardware and you should be good to go.

Did a CPU-only upgrade myself and that was my experience.

 

Thanks for replying, and I do have a question. What should I use to clean off the thermal paste? Also I don't think there is a limit on the cores, as I have not touched it. But I'm not sure if the manufacturer (HP) set one.

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Rubbing alcohol takes care of thermal paste just fine.  You'd preferably want to use newspaper or coffee filters to clean, but if not, just make sure the heatsink is free of any stray fibers before applying new paste.

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Rubbing alcohol takes care of thermal paste just fine.  You'd preferably want to use newspaper or coffee filters to clean, but if not, just make sure the heatsink is free of any stray fibers before applying new paste.

 

Okay, thanks.

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Hey, I installed my new CPU and things seem to be going well. I was wondering however if there is a way to see the temp. of the CPU, as I can't find it in the performance or device monitors on windows.

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I have given it some thought and I was thinking of building a new PC. Mine seems to make a lot of noise when starting, so I think parts of it are on their last legs. So I have some questions.

 

Can I reuse the GTX 1070 and 600W power supply that I have in my PC right now in the new one? If not what are the near best ones to use? I heard GPU prices have gone nuts due to Bitcoin mining.

Where would I get a copy of Windows 10 to use in the new PC?

What is the best, but still not too expensive, motherboard to use? CPU?

Also, do cases come with fans stock or will I have to buy them?

 

Any advice you guys have would be good.

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  • You should be able to use the graphics card.  The power supply shouldn't be an issue as long as it's not proprietary, but it might be something to consider replacing if it's sufficently old (8+ years).  I don't have personal experience on that, however.
  • Sale prices are down to OEM, seems everyone's past the whole crypto thing (and it's moreso other tokens; BTC mining hasn't been profitable for GPUs for a long while).
  • Any computer store should have OEM Windows 10 licenses; not sure how user licensing works these days.  I know some licenses are bound to the Microsoft account, but I'm still on 7 myself.
  • Depends on your desired CPU.  Intel and AMD are fairly competitive at this point; you'll have to decide on that yourself.  Your current latest options are Intel's Coffee Lake (8th generation) and AMD's Ryzen and Threadripper options.  I don't have any personal recommendations here since I don't own any of those; I'd be looking at the same benchmarks you would be.
  • Cases do usually have stock fans in my experience, but it varies (higher-end ones may forgo stock fans and have you buy them separately).  Stock fans should be fine in most cases (i.e., not overclocking and indifferent about the noise level).

Other things:

  • CPU coolers and thermal paste.  Stock is generally fine for defaults, but similar to case fans, you might want to go non-default if you want better cooling / lower noise levels.
  • Desktop RAM prices are a bit higher than they used to be, and you do have to go for DDR4 for any builds with newer parts.
  • Logical Increments' recommendations are up to date with modern parts.  It looks like Ryzen is solid for mid-range offerings.  I used it back in 2012, but being a little wiser now I'd definitely recommend using it as a baseline and not a definitive source (that is, look for sales as well, rather than purchasing the recommendeds).
  • Similar to sales, you can also take a look at secondhand offerings.

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  • You should be able to use the graphics card.  The power supply shouldn't be an issue as long as it's not proprietary, but it might be something to consider replacing if it's sufficently old (8+ years).  I don't have personal experience on that, however.
  • Sale prices are down to OEM, seems everyone's past the whole crypto thing (and it's moreso other tokens; BTC mining hasn't been profitable for GPUs for a long while).
  • Any computer store should have OEM Windows 10 licenses; not sure how user licensing works these days.  I know some licenses are bound to the Microsoft account, but I'm still on 7 myself.
  • Depends on your desired CPU.  Intel and AMD are fairly competitive at this point; you'll have to decide on that yourself.  Your current latest options are Intel's Coffee Lake (8th generation) and AMD's Ryzen and Threadripper options.  I don't have any personal recommendations here since I don't own any of those; I'd be looking at the same benchmarks you would be.
  • Cases do usually have stock fans in my experience, but it varies (higher-end ones may forgo stock fans and have you buy them separately).  Stock fans should be fine in most cases (i.e., not overclocking and indifferent about the noise level).

Other things:

  • CPU coolers and thermal paste.  Stock is generally fine for defaults, but similar to case fans, you might want to go non-default if you want better cooling / lower noise levels.
  • Desktop RAM prices are a bit higher than they used to be, and you do have to go for DDR4 for any builds with newer parts.
  • Logical Increments' recommendations are up to date with modern parts.  It looks like Ryzen is solid for mid-range offerings.  I used it back in 2012, but being a little wiser now I'd definitely recommend using it as a baseline and not a definitive source (that is, look for sales as well, rather than purchasing the recommendeds).
  • Similar to sales, you can also take a look at secondhand offerings.

 

 

Thanks for the advice, it gives me a bit to think about. I will probably have some questions in the future, so I'll contact you on Discord.

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